Apr 18, 2014
534 notes

70sscifiart:

From an entertaining interview of Ian Miller over at Sci-Fi-O-Rama. Check it out for Miller’s thoughts on his upcoming art collection The Art of Ian Miller and on the various series he’s illustrated — out of Tolkien, Bradbury, and Lovecraft, Miller enjoys Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast trilogy the most. I have to admit, it does fit his sense of style.

Check out the interview, and then buy the book.

Apr 17, 2014
146 notes
Facebook is still far and away the best site for sharing photos with friends, but pretending that the acquaintances we’ve accumulated during life are our friends is an outdated way of thinking about social networking.
Facebook’s friend problem | The Verge
Apr 17, 2014
111 notes
Apr 17, 2014
48 notes
Understood in gambling terms, Twitter is a large and popular casino. There are design features that reward you for small victories while distracting you from commensurate failures. There are no clocks in Twitter. Time is displayed differently within its walls, measured not in dates but in distance from the present. All other visible numbers are cumulative, but you are given the impression that the past does not exist. It most certainly does, permanently and yet stripped of protective context.
An explainer on Twitter, by John Herrman. (via zzzzaaaacccchhh)

(via dorkismo)

Apr 17, 2014
364 notes
newmanology:

Byte, April 1981

//

newmanology:

Byte, April 1981

(via richardturley)

Apr 17, 2014
633 notes

(Source: alchemichael)

Apr 17, 2014
55 notes
'Hitman Go' turns cold-blooded murder into an iPad board game
Hitman is about being cold-blooded. It’s a series of stealth games about sneaking around so that you can murder people, and the new mobile spin-off Hitman Go manages to capture that satisfying feeling that comes from expertly plotting a route, maneuvering around guards, and quietly taking down your mark. This fact is surprising not just because it’s a mobile game, and console titles rarely make a seamless transition to the small screen, but because Hitman Go completely reimagines the series as a strangely compelling board game. It doesn’t look like any of the other five Hitman games, but it sure feels like it.

'Hitman Go' turns cold-blooded murder into an iPad board game
Hitman is about being cold-blooded. It’s a series of stealth games about sneaking around so that you can murder people, and the new mobile spin-off Hitman Go manages to capture that satisfying feeling that comes from expertly plotting a route, maneuvering around guards, and quietly taking down your mark. This fact is surprising not just because it’s a mobile game, and console titles rarely make a seamless transition to the small screen, but because Hitman Go completely reimagines the series as a strangely compelling board game. It doesn’t look like any of the other five Hitman games, but it sure feels like it.

Apr 17, 2014
39 notes
Apr 16, 2014
673 notes
dwdesign:

Private commissioned The Fifth Element prints. Regular & variant.

dwdesign:

Private commissioned The Fifth Element prints. Regular & variant.

Apr 16, 2014
215 notes
lovejapanese80s:

悪魔の毒々モンスター (1984)

lovejapanese80s:

悪魔の毒々モンスター (1984)

(Source: mrextrakool, via richardturley)

Apr 16, 2014
18 notes
The app men of Odessa Not every software success story begins in Silicon Valley
Photography by Alex de Mora

The app men of Odessa
Not every software success story begins in Silicon Valley

Photography by Alex de Mora

Apr 16, 2014
1,435 notes

prostheticknowledge:

Play House

Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:

Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]

(via 2087)

Apr 16, 2014
106 notes
The ability to reach everyone I know in one place is no longer a novelty. We don’t want to see daily updates from everyone we meet in perpetuity.

Facebook’s friend problem | The Verge

Ellis Hamburger on why the social network can’t adapt to how we make (and lose) friends

Apr 16, 2014
69 notes
No eternal boy-gang can go without a leader, and Rufio—the triple-mohawked Mad-Max punk who runs the Lost Boys as if they’re a queer postapocalyptic skater gang—is way cooler than Pan ever was. Rufio, as you may be able to tell by my enthusiasm for him even twenty years later, is the only point of identification for the kids this film is ostensibly for. He’s the film’s heart, its real hero. Rufio inevitably beefs with Peter, because here’s Pan, as square as square comes, a dad in a boy’s world, claiming to be the mythical departed leader of the gang. It’s only when Rufio is brutally murdered by Hook that our lust for vengeance accommodates us to Robin Williams—i.e., dad—as an actual hero, and even then we accept him only grudgingly.
Paris Review – The Dadliest Decade, Willie Osterweil
Apr 16, 2014
137 notes
Facebook’s friend problem
In the real world, losing touch with people happens naturally and effortlessly, but on Facebook, unfriending is reserved only for breakups and acts of malice. So, the ghosts floating through my News Feed vastly outnumber the friends I’ve kept. My Friends list went from a roster of my current friends to a collection of everyone I’ve met in the last 10 years — a social group too massive to feel urgent, and too broad to share with on a daily basis. 

Facebook is broken for its earliest users, and perhaps soon, for many of its new ones as well.

Facebook’s friend problem
In the real world, losing touch with people happens naturally and effortlessly, but on Facebook, unfriending is reserved only for breakups and acts of malice. So, the ghosts floating through my News Feed vastly outnumber the friends I’ve kept. My Friends list went from a roster of my current friends to a collection of everyone I’ve met in the last 10 years — a social group too massive to feel urgent, and too broad to share with on a daily basis.

Facebook is broken for its earliest users, and perhaps soon, for many of its new ones as well.

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