Jul 21, 2014
40 notes
Meet the pro ‘Dota 2’ gamers competing for $10 million
Getting paid to play video games sounds like the cushiest job in the world. Stumble out of bed, fill a bowl of cereal, boot up Steam, and go hunting for thrills and spills. Pants and personal hygiene are optional. That’s the pervasive, and in many cases valid, image of the professional gamer — a layabout with a purpose and a paycheck — but there’s a great deal more to making a living from gaming than meets the eye. Games are usually a leisure activity and an entertainment, but now they’re also generating enough income to sustain entire leagues and multimillion-dollar professional competitions.

Meet the pro ‘Dota 2’ gamers competing for $10 million
Getting paid to play video games sounds like the cushiest job in the world. Stumble out of bed, fill a bowl of cereal, boot up Steam, and go hunting for thrills and spills. Pants and personal hygiene are optional. That’s the pervasive, and in many cases valid, image of the professional gamer — a layabout with a purpose and a paycheck — but there’s a great deal more to making a living from gaming than meets the eye. Games are usually a leisure activity and an entertainment, but now they’re also generating enough income to sustain entire leagues and multimillion-dollar professional competitions.

Jul 21, 2014
50 notes
Michel Gondry talks technology, his latest film ‘Mood Indigo, and why he can’t use an iPhone
You wouldn’t notice Michel Gondry unless you were looking for him. The 51-year-old French director of such fantastical, visually mesmerizing movies as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep and Be Kind Rewind is thin, cool, and reserved, though his boyish blue eyes contain a mischievous glimmer. When he speaks about the subjects that impassion him — including his latest film, Mood Indigo, which premiered in the US in limited release this past weekend — he exudes infectious energy.

Michel Gondry talks technology, his latest film ‘Mood Indigo, and why he can’t use an iPhone
You wouldn’t notice Michel Gondry unless you were looking for him. The 51-year-old French director of such fantastical, visually mesmerizing movies as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep and Be Kind Rewind is thin, cool, and reserved, though his boyish blue eyes contain a mischievous glimmer. When he speaks about the subjects that impassion him — including his latest film, Mood Indigo, which premiered in the US in limited release this past weekend — he exudes infectious energy.

Jul 21, 2014
431 notes
descepter:

This is what Space Mountain looks like with the lights on

descepter:

This is what Space Mountain looks like with the lights on

Jul 21, 2014
40 notes
Best New Apps: Overcast for iPhone
If you have an iPhone, you should download Overcast, the new podcast app from Instapaper creator and Tumblr co-founder Marco Arment. Podcast clients are a crowded category, of course, and it’s harder than ever to stand out now that Apple offers its own free solution. But Overcast sets itself apart with thoughtful design, original features, and smart ideas — and it costs nothing to check out.

Best New Apps: Overcast for iPhone
If you have an iPhone, you should download Overcast, the new podcast app from Instapaper creator and Tumblr co-founder Marco Arment. Podcast clients are a crowded category, of course, and it’s harder than ever to stand out now that Apple offers its own free solution. But Overcast sets itself apart with thoughtful design, original features, and smart ideas — and it costs nothing to check out.

Jul 21, 2014
40 notes
Jul 21, 2014
46 notes
Yo represents the radical idea that literally any communication from people in your network is valuable to you — it reduces the actual content of the message to secondary status and lets you fill in the blanks.
Yo: why the silliest app in tech makes the NSA look ridiculous - Vox
Jul 21, 2014
123 notes
Drinking a Blue Screen of Death in the back streets of Tokyo
Hackers Bar will help you drunkenly code the next hit app

Drinking a Blue Screen of Death in the back streets of Tokyo
Hackers Bar will help you drunkenly code the next hit app

Jul 21, 2014
1,094 notes
Morning boot up

Morning boot up

(Source: generic-art, via danforth)

Jul 21, 2014
34 notes

(Source: youtube.com)

Jul 20, 2014
112 notes
Make glitch art with your sound-editing software
Audacity might be a free sound-editing program, but it can also be used to create glitchy, psychedelic image manipulations. University student Jamie Boulton has documented the bizarre effects that can be achieved, while simultaneously providing instructions on how to generate similar results at home.

Make glitch art with your sound-editing software
Audacity might be a free sound-editing program, but it can also be used to create glitchy, psychedelic image manipulations. University student Jamie Boulton has documented the bizarre effects that can be achieved, while simultaneously providing instructions on how to generate similar results at home.

Jul 20, 2014
103 notes
Should you ever find yourself hosting a TV show, remember that the basic tools of the format—cameras, lights, make-up—exist for the sole purpose of turning you into a character, and that said character is, by default, a prick. What no amount of coaching and tech rehearsal will teach you—what you end up discovering only when seeing the first broadcast—is that the person on screen is always someone else. You can’t “be yourself” on TV.
Jul 20, 2014
74 notes

(Source: youtube.com)

Jul 19, 2014
26 notes
I don’t think it would be too far off to compare the difference between Spritz and conventional reading to the difference between bolting a glass of Soylent, and savoring a beautiful dinner with friends.
Maria Bustillos on speed reading: Man Vs. Word - The Awl
Jul 19, 2014
108 notes
From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

Jul 19, 2014
50 notes
Is there another form of communication besides email where the acknowledged goal is to hide all of the communication?Email has evolved into a weird medium of communication where the best thing you can do is destroy it quickly, as if every email were a rabid bat attacking your face.
Doomed to Repeat It — The Message — Medium
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