Apr 16, 2014
43 notes
'Transcendence' review: welcome back to the ’90s
Not even Johnny Depp can save this stale cyber-thriller

'Transcendence' review: welcome back to the ’90s
Not even Johnny Depp can save this stale cyber-thriller

Apr 16, 2014
108 notes
A kinder, gentler robot is coming Robots still aren’t ready to work beside humans, but perhaps a soft touch is the answer

A kinder, gentler robot is coming
Robots still aren’t ready to work beside humans, but perhaps a soft touch is the answer

Apr 16, 2014
110 notes
I think one overall influence is Home Movies, for me. Or Dr. Katz. Because those cartoons are so relaxing to watch. It’s nice to watch conversational dialogue that feels natural and it’s not over the top and cartoony and shrill, in shrill voices or anything. It’s just nice to listen to real people talking.
Pendleton Ward, on inspirations for Adventure Time. (via barthel)
Apr 16, 2014
51 notes
Watch this: Android design head Matias Duarte explains why mobile is dead
Matias Duarte helped design the T-Mobile Sidekick, the Helio Ocean, and Palm’s webOS. Now, he directs the look and feel of Google’s Android operating system. He’s probably not the guy you’d expect to say “mobile is dead.” Those were the words that left his mouth, though, at the 2014 Accel Design Conference in San Francisco. There, Verge editor-in-chief Joshua Topolsky interviewed him about his thoughts on design and where Android is headed.

Watch this: Android design head Matias Duarte explains why mobile is dead
Matias Duarte helped design the T-Mobile Sidekick, the Helio Ocean, and Palm’s webOS. Now, he directs the look and feel of Google’s Android operating system. He’s probably not the guy you’d expect to say “mobile is dead.” Those were the words that left his mouth, though, at the 2014 Accel Design Conference in San Francisco. There, Verge editor-in-chief Joshua Topolsky interviewed him about his thoughts on design and where Android is headed.

Apr 15, 2014
320 notes
Apr 15, 2014
282 notes

Project Ara: building the module smartphone (by The Verge

Apr 15, 2014
70 notes

Drone selfies

jkottke:

For the past couple of months, Amit Gupta has been playing around with taking moving self-portraits with a camera mounted on a drone. Here’s an early effort. This past weekend, Amit’s efforts crossed over into the realm of art. This is beautiful:

In the comments at Vimeo, Alex Dao dubbed this type of photograph a “dronie”. We’ll see if that catches on.

Apr 15, 2014
59 notes
There are no clocks in Twitter. Time is displayed differently within its walls, measured not in dates but in distance from the present. All other visible numbers are cumulative, but you are given the impression that the past does not exist. It most certainly does, permanently and yet stripped of protective context.
Should You Tweet? - The Awl
Apr 15, 2014
56 notes
This is a pathogenic organism that evolved from something that wasn’t pathogenic, and then morphed into something extremely infectious — and now we know how it happened.
It only took 35 years for flesh-eating bacteria to become an infectious terror | The Verge
Apr 15, 2014
335 notes
Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone
A handful of Google engineers and designers are building a phone the DARPA way

Building blocks: how Project Ara is reinventing the smartphone
A handful of Google engineers and designers are building a phone the DARPA way

Apr 15, 2014
19 notes

In Deep

longform:

The dark and dangerous world of extreme cavers.

Apr 15, 2014
232 notes
Play this: ‘Super Planet Crash’ tests your god mode
Sometimes, it’s easy to forget what a serendipitous marvel our universe really is. At least, until you’ve tried building your own. Super Planet Crash is a browser-based simulation that requires players to forge a planetary system capable of surviving at least 500 years. The interface is simple: left-click to place up to 11 astronomical objects of varying sizes anywhere within the defined limits. What makes it challenging is how the gravitational field of each celestial body affects others around it. Even a single dwarf star can throw everything out of orbit.

Play this: ‘Super Planet Crash’ tests your god mode
Sometimes, it’s easy to forget what a serendipitous marvel our universe really is. At least, until you’ve tried building your own. Super Planet Crash is a browser-based simulation that requires players to forge a planetary system capable of surviving at least 500 years. The interface is simple: left-click to place up to 11 astronomical objects of varying sizes anywhere within the defined limits. What makes it challenging is how the gravitational field of each celestial body affects others around it. Even a single dwarf star can throw everything out of orbit.

Apr 14, 2014
1,716 notes

(Source: defolter)

Apr 14, 2014
8,841 notes

snubpollard:

(Spider-Man, Ryōichi Ikegami, written with Kazumasa Hirai, c.1971)

Apr 14, 2014
302 notes
antbaena:

Ido Yehimovitz

antbaena:

Ido Yehimovitz

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