Jul 20, 2014
112 notes
Make glitch art with your sound-editing software
Audacity might be a free sound-editing program, but it can also be used to create glitchy, psychedelic image manipulations. University student Jamie Boulton has documented the bizarre effects that can be achieved, while simultaneously providing instructions on how to generate similar results at home.

Make glitch art with your sound-editing software
Audacity might be a free sound-editing program, but it can also be used to create glitchy, psychedelic image manipulations. University student Jamie Boulton has documented the bizarre effects that can be achieved, while simultaneously providing instructions on how to generate similar results at home.

Jul 20, 2014
105 notes
Should you ever find yourself hosting a TV show, remember that the basic tools of the format—cameras, lights, make-up—exist for the sole purpose of turning you into a character, and that said character is, by default, a prick. What no amount of coaching and tech rehearsal will teach you—what you end up discovering only when seeing the first broadcast—is that the person on screen is always someone else. You can’t “be yourself” on TV.
Jul 20, 2014
74 notes

(Source: youtube.com)

Jul 19, 2014
28 notes
I don’t think it would be too far off to compare the difference between Spritz and conventional reading to the difference between bolting a glass of Soylent, and savoring a beautiful dinner with friends.
Maria Bustillos on speed reading: Man Vs. Word - The Awl
Jul 19, 2014
108 notes
From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

Jul 19, 2014
50 notes
Is there another form of communication besides email where the acknowledged goal is to hide all of the communication?Email has evolved into a weird medium of communication where the best thing you can do is destroy it quickly, as if every email were a rabid bat attacking your face.
Doomed to Repeat It — The Message — Medium
Jul 18, 2014
865 notes
bubblegumcrash:

Megazone 23

Weekend: locked in

bubblegumcrash:

Megazone 23

Weekend: locked in

(Source: zeonn, via rekall)

Jul 18, 2014
96 notes
MIT upgrades the human hand with two robotic fingers
Stirring the milk you just poured in a hot cup of coffee usually requires two hands: one to hold the cup, and one to hold the spoon. The same goes for unscrewing the cap on a large bottle of soda. But students at MIT might have finally found a solution to this two-handed headache — albeit one that requires a slight upgrade.

MIT upgrades the human hand with two robotic fingers
Stirring the milk you just poured in a hot cup of coffee usually requires two hands: one to hold the cup, and one to hold the spoon. The same goes for unscrewing the cap on a large bottle of soda. But students at MIT might have finally found a solution to this two-handed headache — albeit one that requires a slight upgrade.

Jul 18, 2014
25 notes
Jul 18, 2014
506 notes
70sscifiart:

Syd Mead

70sscifiart:

Syd Mead

(via 2087)

Jul 18, 2014
225 notes

(Source: komuononado, via heyyoshimi)

Jul 17, 2014
1,910 notes

(Source: driftstage)

Jul 17, 2014
418 notes

timewastingmachine:

You’ve all seen this Tram, don’t you? But there’s one little thing I’d like to share.

The thing is, I was lucky enough to be a part of the design team, from the very first sketch to the time of the presentation.

That’s why you see bonus photo of me. Enjoy!

Jul 17, 2014
23 notes
You can quite easily feel this movement yourself, as Javal’s associate M. Lamare discovered in the lab of the Sorbonne, right around the same time Hering made his observations. Just close one eye, rest your finger lightly on the closed eyelid, and read with your other eye; you’ll be able to feel a whole flurry of saccades.
Man Vs. Word - The Awl
Jul 17, 2014
48 notes

(Source: youtube.com)

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