Aug 25, 2014
23 notes
Aug 25, 2014
67 notes

The Oculus Rift helped helped James Blaha see 3D for the first time in his life. Now his Kickstarter company Diplopia is using virtual reality to help other people with vision disorders.

(Source: youtube.com)

Aug 25, 2014
39 notes

Oculus Rift and Project Morpheus use headsets. But KeckCAVES at UC Davis uses projectors to create a virtual reality “cave.” Is it the future of VR?

(Source: youtube.com)

Aug 25, 2014
76 notes

Virtual insanity

VR through pop culture history

Aug 25, 2014
58 notes
Digital Natives
Jaron Lanier and Kevin Kelly discuss the past, present, and future of virtual reality

Digital Natives
Jaron Lanier and Kevin Kelly discuss the past, present, and future of virtual reality

Aug 25, 2014
50 notes
For me, the very most important thing about VR was that when you were in it, you’d feel your own existence in the sense that if all the sensory input is artificial, then what’s floating there, that’s your consciousness. So to me, it was sort of proof that subjectivity is real; that consciousness is real, that it’s not just a construct that we put on things.
Jaron Lanier and Kevin Kelly talking about the past, present, and future of virtual reality
Aug 25, 2014
30 notes
Voices from a virtual past
An oral history of a technology whose time has come again

Voices from a virtual past

An oral history of a technology whose time has come again

Aug 25, 2014
55 notes
The Rise and Fall and Rise of Virtual Reality
In the wake of Facebook’s purchase of Oculus VR, can this revolutionary technology triumph anew?

The Rise and Fall and Rise of Virtual Reality

In the wake of Facebook’s purchase of Oculus VR, can this revolutionary technology triumph anew?

Aug 25, 2014
2,263 notes

(Source: floorcharts, via vhsdreamz)

Aug 24, 2014
110 notes
Disney thinks it could turn drones into flying TV screens and puppet masters
Disney has never lagged in animatronics or high technology for its shows and theme parks — they’re more or less tiny, high-tech surveillance dystopias with classic rides, exorbitantly expensive food, and all your favorite TV and movie characters from childhood. But a handful of patent applications pointed out by MarketWatch are particularly interesting: the company is coming up with ways to use drones as TV screens and animatronic puppet masters. Each of the patents outlines uses for synchronized swarms of tiny quadcopters or multicopters, which could either supplement or replace its existing light shows, fireworks displays, and parade balloons.

Disney thinks it could turn drones into flying TV screens and puppet masters
Disney has never lagged in animatronics or high technology for its shows and theme parks — they’re more or less tiny, high-tech surveillance dystopias with classic rides, exorbitantly expensive food, and all your favorite TV and movie characters from childhood. But a handful of patent applications pointed out by MarketWatch are particularly interesting: the company is coming up with ways to use drones as TV screens and animatronic puppet masters. Each of the patents outlines uses for synchronized swarms of tiny quadcopters or multicopters, which could either supplement or replace its existing light shows, fireworks displays, and parade balloons.

Aug 23, 2014
71 notes
It sounds stupid. Their cuteness makes any serious conversation about emojis difficult, like talking to a baby in a grown-up voice. It feels embarrassing to posit these little cartoons as a vehicle of emotion or even a global language, yet they really are an almost universally understood form of communication.
Everybody Smiley Poops — Matter — Medium
Aug 23, 2014
17,409 notes
beesandbombs:

twisting circle

beesandbombs:

twisting circle

(via 2087)

Aug 23, 2014
24 notes

Coming Monday!

(Source: youtube.com)

Aug 22, 2014
135 notes
What’s in your bag, Verge Readers?
As a Hack Week special, we’re opening up What’s In Your Bag to everyone. Just lay out your essential gear, take a picture and upload it to the tool below. We want to see it all: the phone, the notebook, and whatever else you like to keep around. Thanks to our photo tool, you’ll see it pop up alongside dozens of other bags, combining into a glorious tapestry of stuff. What’s in your bag, really? What’s in everyone’s bag? What’s in the world’s bag?

What’s in your bag, Verge Readers?
As a Hack Week special, we’re opening up What’s In Your Bag to everyone. Just lay out your essential gear, take a picture and upload it to the tool below. We want to see it all: the phone, the notebook, and whatever else you like to keep around. Thanks to our photo tool, you’ll see it pop up alongside dozens of other bags, combining into a glorious tapestry of stuff. What’s in your bag, really? What’s in everyone’s bag? What’s in the world’s bag?

Aug 22, 2014
50 notes
Everybody in this office has had the experience where one of the graphics editors will be walking around with a camera and you see them walk toward your desk and they tap you on the shoulder,” Berkley says. “Personally I’ve been two superheroes, two teens, and a body double for Vice President Biden.
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